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Webinar: Comparing Non-Traditional Water Treatment in Cooling Towers

16 May

May 28 at 12 P.M. CDT
Register at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/133134529

Learn How New Cooling Tower Treatment Systems Can Save Water, Money and Support Climate Change Resilience

Sponsored by:

  • Council on Environmental Quality
  • Office of the Federal Environmental Executive
  • GreenGov Initiative focused on Federal collaboration across the United States

Comparing Non-Traditional Water Treatment in Cooling Towers

 

Hear about how GSA, Region 8, and DOE/NREL are finding ways to dramatically reduce cooling tower water usage and treatment chemicals, which saves money and can support climate adaptation and resilience efforts.

 

Cooling towers, which are installed in many federal buildings, consume large amounts of potable water and contribute greatly to annual utility, maintenance and operation costs. Conventional cooling towers require that chemicals and fresh water is periodically added to the cooling tower system to prevent scale formulation, hinder biological growth, and inhibit corrosion in the chillers and piping systems. GSA and DOE/NREL analyzed several non-chemical cooling tower water treatment systems to identify systems that reduce building operation costs through reduced water and chemical use, and improved chiller energy efficiency.

 

Hear Their Story

 

GSA has a story to share on how new cooling tower treatment systems can help agencies save water and money, and support resiliency in drought-prone locations. Join us and hear this story.

 

What is a GreenGov Spotlight Community? 

When multiple federal partners located near each other work together to leverage regional resources and help achieve the goals of President Obama’s Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy and Economic Performance.  Spotlight Communities help cut government costs, increase efficiency, reduce carbon emissions, leverage resources among different agencies, and show us what is possible when we work together.


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